Thursday, March 23, 2017

Schema.org 3.2: courses, fact-checking, digital publishing accessibility, menus and more...

Schema.org 3.2 is released! This update brings many improvements including new vocabulary for describing courses, fact-check reviews, digital publishing accessibility, as well as a more thorough treatment of menus and a large number of pending proposals which are offered for early-access use, evaluation and improvement. We also introduce a new "hosted extension" area, iot.schema.org which provides an entry point for schema collaborations relating to the Internet of Things field. As always, our releases page has full details.

These efforts depend entirely on a growing network of collaborations, within our own W3C Community Group and beyond. Many thanks are due to the Schema Course Extension Community Group, the IDPF's Epub Accessibility Working Group, members of the international fact-checking network including the Duke Reporters Lab and Full Fact, the W3C Web of Things and Spatial Web initiatives, the Bioschemas project, and to Wikipedia's Wikidata project.

This release also provides the opportunity to thank two of our longest-serving steering group members, whose careers have moved on from the world of structured data markup. Peter Mika and Martin Hepp have both played leading roles in Schema.org since its earliest days, and the project has benefited greatly from their insight, commitment and attention to detail.

As we look towards future developments, it is worth taking a brief recap on how we have organized things recently. Schema.org's primary discussion forum is a W3C group, although its most detailed collaborations are typically in Github, organized around specific issues and proposed changes. These discussions are open to all interested parties. Schema designs frequently draw upon related groups that have a more specific topical focus. For example, the Courses group became a hub for education/learning metadata experts from LRMI and others. This need to engage with relevant experts also motivated the creation of the "pending" area introduced in our previous release. Github is a site oriented towards computer programmers. By surfacing proposed, experimental and other early access designs at pending.schema.org we hope we can reach a wider audience who may have insight to share. With today's release, we add 14 new "pending" designs, with courses, accessibility and fact-checking markup graduating from pending into the core section of schema.org. Future releases will follow this pipeline approach, encouraging greater consistency, quality and clarity as our vocabulary continues to evolve.



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